Journalistic Practices and Knowledge Production

In 1903, the Austrian journalist Emil Löbl observed that "many of today's readers" see their newspaper as a "universal encyclopedia," the study of which, they believed, satisfied their duty as "cultivated people" (Kulturmenschen) to stay informed. Whether or not this was a positive development, journalists needed to recognize that "modern readers expected of newspapers the … Continue reading Journalistic Practices and Knowledge Production

Towards a History of Missionary Knowledge? Impressions from the Conference “Mapping Entanglements”

On February 10 and 11, we held a conference entitled "Mapping Entanglements: Missionary Knowledge and ‘Materialities’ across Space and Time (16th–20th centuries)." Broadly speaking, the conference posited that what we know about missionaries is not the same as what we know from missionaries, and it aimed to examine the history of the latter under the … Continue reading Towards a History of Missionary Knowledge? Impressions from the Conference “Mapping Entanglements”

Religious Knowledge in Historical Perspective

My year began with a session at the 131st Annual Meeting of the American Historical Association on “the dynamics of religious knowledge” in the modern era, a panel I organized with Simone Lässig. The three papers—presented by Anthony Steinhoff, Jana Tschurenev, and myself—approached developments in religious knowledge as manifestations of social and cultural change in … Continue reading Religious Knowledge in Historical Perspective