Developing Knowledge Societies: Africa Needs a Linguistic Revolution

African societies are on the brink of changing from postcolonial societies into global knowledge societies. Digitalization and globalization could enhance their transformation from knowledge-consuming to knowledge-producing societies, which would also help bring full mental decolonization to Africa. Just as important, it would open the way for African indigenous knowledge systems to enjoy recognition in the … Continue reading Developing Knowledge Societies: Africa Needs a Linguistic Revolution

Navigating the Silence of Enslavement: Does the Eurovision Song Contest Community Need To Know Lisbon’s History of Slavery?

It has taken sixty-one editions of the Eurovision Song Contest, and fifty-three years of Portuguese participation, for any Portuguese city to have the chance to host the annual song competition and show the contest's reputed 200 million viewers its own interpretation of Europe's cultural identity. Portugal's reputation as one of the longest-running Eurovision entrants never … Continue reading Navigating the Silence of Enslavement: Does the Eurovision Song Contest Community Need To Know Lisbon’s History of Slavery?

Insights into Loss from the History of Knowledge

This post is part confession and part revelation. When Simone Lässig approached me about collaborating on migration and the history of knowledge, I immediately agreed.[1] I began writing about German scientists and the production of knowledge over twenty years ago, and much of my current work involves migrants.[2] Taking part in the GHI effort offered … Continue reading Insights into Loss from the History of Knowledge

Political Interpretations of Knowledge in Colonial Contexts

Attractive classroom scene

In the 1970s and 1980s, the concept of the “knowledge society” (Wissensgesellschaft ) rapidly gained in popularity among social scientists and politicians in Western countries.[1] The concept referred to a socioeconomic system that was no longer organized around the manufacture of material—especially industrial—goods but instead around the production of knowledge, expertise, and highly specialized skills. Continue reading

Spreading the Good News: International Family-Planning Activism and Grassroots Information Networks in the 20th Century

In August 1939, the newly formed Jamaica Birth Control League opened the island’s first birth control clinic in Kingston to distribute diaphragms at cost or free to working-class women. To advertise their services, the League published a small, discreet notice in the “Wanted” section of the Daily Gleaner, the island’s main newspaper. Within a year … Continue reading

Towards a History of Missionary Knowledge? Impressions from the Conference ‘Mapping Entanglements’

On February 10 and 11, we held a conference entitled "Mapping Entanglements: Missionary Knowledge and ‘Materialities’ across Space and Time (16th–20th centuries)." Broadly speaking, the conference posited that what we know about missionaries is not the same as what we know from missionaries, and it aimed to examine the history of the latter under the … Continue reading Towards a History of Missionary Knowledge? Impressions from the Conference ‘Mapping Entanglements’