Hygiene Propaganda and Theatrical Biopolitics in the Soviet Union in the 1920s–40s

The Bolshevik Revolution strove to create a “new man,” a morally and psychologically superior human being. This new man required a complete physical and mental renewal, including, among other measures, the hygienic literacy of the masses. A wide range of media were employed for the Revolution’s ends, including not only various forms of print but also mobile cinemas and theatrical productions. A theater movement aimed at instructing the masses gained strength in the early years of the Revolution, and many theatrical performances addressed prevailing problems in public health. The hygienic awareness of the population was especially crucial during World War I and the Russian Civil War that followed, when diseases flourished in conditions of hunger and claimed millions of lives. In the 1920s, the performances came to local clubhouses and reached even the kolkhoz fields to entertain and educate workers and farmers. Beginning in 1925, theatrical hygiene propaganda was centrally managed by the newly founded Moscow Theater for Sanitary Culture (1924–1947). Continue reading “Hygiene Propaganda and Theatrical Biopolitics in the Soviet Union in the 1920s–40s”

Spinning the Risk: ‘The Effects of Nuclear Weapons’ Handbook

The Effects of Nuclear Weapons was by far the most popular handbook of nuclear defense during the Cold War. Adapted from an original publication of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (1950),[1] the handbook was amended and made commercially available for popular use (1957),[2] revised (1962),[3] reprinted (1964),[4] expanded (1977),[5] and even illicitly translated into Russian for use in the Soviet Union (1960).[6] Edited by Samuel Glasstone, a prolific author of science textbooks, The Effects of Nuclear Weapons was described as a “comprehensive summary of current knowledge on the effects of nuclear weapons” and commended by the Federal Civil Defense Administration as “the definitive source of information on the effects of nuclear weapons.”[7] Continue reading “Spinning the Risk: ‘The Effects of Nuclear Weapons’ Handbook”

Histories of Knowledge around the Web

Monk leading stubborn donkey while reading book
“Pursuit of Knowledge under Difficulties” by Wordsworth Thompson (Boston, MA: L. Prang & Co., 1878), Library of Congress, PPOC, http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2016649779/.

Ten Links

  1. “Teaching Soviet Children the Language of Science and Technology” by Laura Todd at The Language of ‘Authoritarian’ Regimes, June 28, 2017
  2. “What We Can Learn from Fake News” by Paul J. Croce at the History News Network, July 23, 2017
  3. “How African American Activists are Influencing Latinos” by Aaron Fountain at Black Perspectives, July 25, 2017
  4. “An African American Pioneer in Greece: John Wesley Gilbert and the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, 1890–1891” by John W. I. Lee at From the Archivist’s Notebook, August 1, 2017
  5. “The Forgotten World of Communist Bookstores” by Joshua Clarke Davis at Jacobin, August 11, 2017
  6. “The Significance of Scripts” by Elisabeth Chaghafi at Shakespeare’s World, August 24, 2017
  7. “The Racist Roots of Gynecology and What Black Women Birthed” by Sherronda J. Brown at Wear Your Voice, August 29, 2017
  8. “(In)Forming Revolution Series: Information Networks in the Age of Revolutions” at Age of Revolutions, September 4–29, 2017
  9. “How to Become a Doctor (in 1949)” by Allison Piazza at Books, Health, and History (New York Academy of Medicine), September 5, 2017
  10. “Race, Law & Literature—A New Course” by Eddie Bruce-Jones on his eponymously named blog, September 10, 2017