Join the Army and Learn a Trade

U.S. Army recruitment poster from 1918, just after the Great War. One wonders how much the prospective recruit would have known about the far-flung U.S military activities indicated on the map. Uncle Sam, it seems, was banking on at least some interest in the greater world but even more on the attractiveness of the skills and more practical inducements he could offer. Source: Library of Congress, PPOC, http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2002719778/.

Knowledge Notes

Challenging Inherited Knowledge Systems

From a report by Jason Farago on a noteworthy exhibit at the Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe in Hamburg, Germany:

By and large, “Mobile Worlds” delivers on its contention that European museums need to do much more than just restitute plundered objects in their collections, important as that is. A 21st-century universal museum has to unsettle the very labels that the age of imperialism bequeathed to us: nations and races, East and West, art and craft. It’s not enough just to call for “decolonization,” a recent watchword in European museum studies; the whole fiction of cultural purity has to go, too. Any serious museum can only be a museum of our entangled past and present. The game is to not to tear down the walls, but to narrate those entanglements so that a new, global audience recognizes itself within them.

See the whole piece in the New York Times.

Via the Twittersphere

J. Laurence Laughlin, Methods of Teaching Political Economy (1885), chap. 5, at Irwin Collier, Economics in the Rearview Mirror.

No matter how clear the exposition of the principles may be [in a lecture], no matter how fresh and striking the illustrations, it still remains that the student is relieved by the instructor from carrying on the mental processes which he ought to conduct for himself.

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Knowledge Notes

Knowledge Notes