‘Knowledge in the Making’ at Forum Wissen Göttingen

Knowledge is not a static entity. It is not obtained by discovering universal truths. Instead, it is a process of creation and simultaneously an outcome. It is mediated, socially (re)defined, and accepted or rejected. It always contains an underlying sense of rationality, however understood, and is dependent on temporal and spatial contexts. This dynamic image … Continue reading ‘Knowledge in the Making’ at Forum Wissen Göttingen

Learning by the Book: Manuals and Handbooks in the History of Knowledge

Some Examples and a Call for Papers (Deadline: July 15, 2017) Manuals and handbooks are widely disseminated tools in the production and circulation of knowledge, used not only in education, science, and technology, but also in broader social and cultural contexts, such as the arts, religion, business, and politics. Undertaking to present a concise body … Continue reading Learning by the Book: Manuals and Handbooks in the History of Knowledge

From Cultural History to the History of Knowledge

The history of knowledge is flourishing. Exciting conferences are being arranged, new institutional arrangements are emerging, and a whole range of fresh studies are being published. German-speaking scholars have led the way by proclaiming that Wissensgeschichte (the history of knowledge) is something different than Wissenschaftsgeschichte (the history of science and scholarship), and in the 2010s … Continue reading From Cultural History to the History of Knowledge

Editorial News

Mark Stoneman has been busy the past couple weeks with a special issue of Geschichte & Gesellschaft  on migrant knowledge. The issue, which should appear later this summer, is edited by Simone Lässig and Swen Steinberg, and all but one of the articles is in English. Also contributing are Jan Logemann, Rebekka v. Mallinckrodt, Glenn … Continue reading Editorial News

Visual Epistemology and a Short History of the Monstrous Races

As nations brace to firm up their borders in 2017, a short history of people who inhabited the periphery reminds us of the role boundaries played in an earlier era of globalization. The early woodcuts that helped define this periphery offer a window into the history of knowledge about the Other and also tell us … Continue reading Visual Epistemology and a Short History of the Monstrous Races

Boys’ Life

Following up on Mischa Honeck's interesting post, "Innocent Ignorance: Whitewashing an Empire with the Boy Scouts of America," which includes a link to a 1914 Boy Scout Handbook, we have found a year's worth of Boys' Life from 1915 at the Internet Archive. This official BSA magazine contains stories, Scouting news, advice, photographs, advertisements, and … Continue reading Boys’ Life

Rodin’s Thinker, the New Deal, and Libraries as Spaces of Knowledge

Commenting on his famous work Le Penseur,  or The Thinker,  a century ago, the French sculptor Auguste Rodin described his subject in terms of its utter (masculine) physicality. “What makes my Thinker think is that he thinks not only with his brain, with his knitted brow, his distended nostrils and compressed lips, but with every … Continue reading Rodin’s Thinker, the New Deal, and Libraries as Spaces of Knowledge

Innocent Ignorance: Whitewashing an Empire with the Boy Scouts of America

The history of organized youth has much to offer scholars interested in processes of knowledge formation and dissemination. This is particularly true of an organization as easily recognizable and widely influential as the Boy Scouts of America (BSA). Popular culture in the United States is replete with images of cheerful Scouts roaming the woods or … Continue reading Innocent Ignorance: Whitewashing an Empire with the Boy Scouts of America